All in Research Blog

When Your Doctor Says You're Fine, Part 4 - Testing for Minerals and Heavy Metals

Ensuring that you aren’t deficient in all the critical minerals is one facet of healing that often gets overlooked in chronic illness, but was critical in helping me regain my energy after years of treating gut disorders.

However, conventional testing for mineral status and heavy metals isn’t always the most reliable. That’s why I recommend using testing like the Hair Tissue Mineral Analysis (HTMA) to learn what’s really going on with your body’s mineral deficiencies or heavy metal toxicity.


When Your Doctor Says You're Fine, Part 3 - Analyzing Hormone Test Results

Figuring out what your hormone status is can be one of the biggest keys to unlocking true healing on your journey to health.

However, conventional hormone testing via blood is usually not the most accurate, and could possibly lead to you missing some irregularities in your hormones.

I prefer testing my hormones via urine using a DUTCH test. This way I make sure that I’m only looking at the hormone levels that bioavailable and being used by my body, and I can track my hormone levels (specifically cortisol) over time.

Digging deeper into our hormone status using functional testing is so critical in recovery from chronic illness or autoimmune disease!

When Your Doctor Says You're Fine, Part 2 - Analyzing Stool Test Results

Stool testing can be an important diagnostic tool for anyone with an autoimmune disease, or chronic illness. These tests can give you an inside look into one of the most complex systems in your body, your gut.

However, simply relying on conventional stool testing, without doing your own research to determine how the lab is analyzing the sample could leave you with some missing pieces to your gut health puzzle.

I recommend using a functional stool test (like GI MAP or Viome) in order to get you the most complete and accurate read on what’s actually going on inside your gut.

These tests are going to be a little pricier than what you’ll get from your GI doc (and most likely won’t be covered by insurance), but if your finances allow it’s so totally worth it to have a higher degree of certainty that you aren’t missing anything in your gut that could be contributing to your ill health.

Tips For Reintroductions on the low-FODMAP Diet

The low-FODMAP diet isn’t forever, and it’s really only a tool to use to reduce your IBS and SIBO symptoms while you work on healing your gut and getting rid of any overgrowths.

I know how difficult it is to work on expanding your diet after you’ve been eating low-FODMAP for a while and feeling great. But it’s important to reintroduce these carbs as they’re the only source of food for your good gut bacteria.

So, I came up with a few tips for helping you get started in your FODMAP reintroductions!

#1: Work on introducing the category of FODMAPs you don’t react to

#2: Start with small portion sizes

#3: Support your digestion

#4: Don’t stop reintroducing if you experience some symptoms

Vegetables - How and Why to Add More to Your Diet

Eating more vegetables is such an important piece to a healthy lifestyle.

Vegetables provide the best source of antioxidants and phytonutrients out of any food you can eat.

Unfortunately, vegetables are also the most unpleasant and difficult for most people to consume, so they tend to be overlooked for more satisfying foods.

In this article, I’ll answer some common questions about why vegetables should actually make up a majority of our plates, and how you can go about starting to eat more of them each day.